Cruising with the Gondolas?

Just a day sail south of Porto was the surprising town of Aveiro. So small we almost missed it, and that would have been a great shame. Beyond the coast lies a maze of canals and lagoons, alongside an industrial port. But if you persist inland, you reach a colourful town where the Portuguese version of gondolas, moliceiros, would have traditionally carried the local harvests of salt and seaweed, but now carry visitor along the canals to explore the city.

Private sailing catamaran charter Aveiro Portugal

We found the perfect place for lunch with the local speciality of roasted piglet. Yum!! The set lunch menu came with a mini jug of wine… not too shabby!

Private sailing catamaran charter Aveiro Portugal

Portuguese Pea Soup Fog

We were very sad to leave Galicia and all the wonderful food and wine, but it was time to start moving south again. Vana de Castelo, just across the border into Portugal, was a wonderful first stop with it’s flower-filled streets, leafy boulevards and imposing hilltop church.

The church at the top of the hill has it’s own funicular!

Amazing views of the Rio Lima estuary

Not a bad place to catch the sunset

The Templo do Sagrado Coração de Jesus

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So many flowers adorning the buildings of the old town

The uber-modern swing bridge / boardwalk closing off the marina from the river

Our early morning departure from the marina gave a hint of what awaited us…

Hours sitting on the bow looking for fishing boats and crab pots!

As soon as we emerged from the river’s mouth Makara was engulfed in crazy thick fog. I ventured up front to keep watch, while Tadd set the obnoxious, but oh-so-important fog horn on automatic. This is how we spent the whole day!

The fog was so thick that the moisture condensed on my eyelashes and made it seem like I was crying…. all the way to Porto!

InReach Plays Pivotal Role In Saving Novelists Life

When Tadd and I talk to people about our planned adventures sailing around the world, starting with crossing the Atlantic next spring, they are typically surprised that we’re so excited about the prospect of being out in the middle of the ocean, hundreds of miles from land. Of course there is a scary element to launching on any offshore voyage, but like anything in life, preparation is everything. And a big part of that prep is safety equipment, from lifelines running from bow to stern of the boat (so that we can be tethered to the boat at all times) to auto-inflating lifejackets on all people on deck, and from exposure suits (it’s damn chilly out there!) to a “ditch bag” all packed with emergency items, first aid, gps and food etc, to be grabbed at the last moment before abandoning ship (should the worst happen… remember, always step up into a life raft!). So last year Tadd invested in one more safety device, which until now has been used for fun rather than any emergency!

We have a Delorme inReach, which is what allows friends and family to check here on our site and see where we are. It’s a small but great device… so great this amazing piece of innovation was, of course, acquired by the giant, Garmin. But as fun as it has been, it will be a great comfort to us during our major journeys, and here’s precisely why:

michael-hurley “Less than halfway through his 3,400 ­mile solo trip to Ireland, novelist Michael Hurley’s sailboat began taking on water. What could have easily become a tragic tale was saved thanks to his inReach, which he had brought on the trip to stay in contact with family and post to social media. Michael used his DeLorme inReach to send out a distress text which the Coast Guard relayed to all vessels in the area, including Michael’s exact coordinates and bearing. Help arrived less than two hours after the signal was sent. Now Michael says he’ll make sure to bring his inReach with him whenever he plans to go off the grid.”  To read more…